Topic: Calendar

Garry Winogrand at SFMOMA through June 02, 2013

Garry Winogrand, Untitled Sailor on Street, 1950; At SFMOMA (San Francisco Museum of Modern Art)

Garry Winogrand, Untitled Sailor on Street, 1950; At SFMOMA (San Francisco Museum of Modern Art)

San Francisco Museum of Modern Art

Widely acknowledged as one of the most important photographers of the 20th century, Garry Winogrand (1928-1984) captured moments of everyday American life in the postwar era, producing an expansive picture of a nation rich with possibility yet threatening to spin out of control. He did much of his best-known work in New York in the 1960s, becoming a major voice of that tumultuous decade. But he also roamed widely around the United States, from California and Texas to Miami and Chicago. He photographed the rich and powerful and everyday strangers on the street; antiwar protesters and politicians; airports and zoos. In many of these pictures, humor and visual energy are the flip sides of an anxious instability. As photographer and guest curator Leo Rubinfien says, “The hope and buoyancy of middle-class life in postwar America is half of the emotional heart of Winogrand’s work. The other half is a sense of undoing.”

When he died suddenly at age 56, Winogrand left behind thousands of rolls of exposed but undeveloped film and unedited contact sheets — some 250,000 frames in total. Nearly 100 of these pictures have been printed for the first time for this long-awaited retrospective of his work. By presenting such archival discoveries alongside celebrated pictures, Garry Winogrand reframes a career that was, like the artist’s America, both epic and unresolved. This exhibition has been jointly organized by SFMOMA and the National Gallery of Art in Washington, and will travel to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, Jeu de Paume in Paris, and Fundación MAPFRE in Madrid.

Garry Winogrand retrospective at SFMOMA

Garry Winogrand - World's Fair New York City, 1964

Garry Winogrand, New York World’s Fair, 1964; gelatin silver print; Collection SFMOMA, Gift of Dr. L. F. Peede, Jr.; © The Estate of Garry Winogrand, courtesy Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco.

The big Garry Winogrand retrospective at SFMOMA that we first told you about nearly a year ago is now open! It includes 100 never-before-seen prints from the 250,000 (!) exposed photographs left behind when Winogrand died in 1984:

Garry Winogrand: March 09 – June 02, 2013

Widely acknowledged as one of the most important photographers of the 20th century, Garry Winogrand (1928-1984) captured moments of everyday American life in the postwar era, producing an expansive picture of a nation rich with possibility yet threatening to spin out of control. He did much of his best-known work in New York in the 1960s, becoming a major voice of that tumultuous decade. But he also roamed widely around the United States, from California and Texas to Miami and Chicago. He photographed the rich and powerful and everyday strangers on the street; antiwar protesters and politicians; airports and zoos. In many of these pictures, humor and visual energy are the flip sides of an anxious instability. As photographer and guest curator Leo Rubinfien says, “The hope and buoyancy of middle-class life in postwar America is half of the emotional heart of Winogrand’s work. The other half is a sense of undoing.”

When he died suddenly at age 56, Winogrand left behind thousands of rolls of exposed but undeveloped film and unedited contact sheets — some 250,000 frames in total. Nearly 100 of these pictures have been printed for the first time for this long-awaited retrospective of his work. By presenting such archival discoveries alongside celebrated pictures, Garry Winogrand reframes a career that was, like the artist’s America, both epic and unresolved. This exhibition has been jointly organized by SFMOMA and the National Gallery of Art in Washington, and will travel to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, Jeu de Paume in Paris, and Fundación MAPFRE in Madrid.

Be sure to see it at least once before the show closes on June 2. The whole museum will close on that date as well, as it embarks on a three-year expansion project.

Today’s talk: authentic brand stories and names

I’ll be giving a talk at 1:00 pm today, “Get Real: Creating Authentic Brand Stories and Names,” at the Where’s the Money — Access to Capital Business Expo in San Francisco 2012. Stop by if you’re in the neighborhood.

Philosophy Talk Live: The Linguistics of Name-Calling with Geoffrey Nunberg

Linguist_Author_Geoffrey_Nunberg

After being a loyal KQED Public Radio 88.50 listener for over 15 years, recently I often find my ear bending toward “the oldest non-commercial FM signal west of the Mississippi,” 91.7 FM, KALW. Why? Perhaps its the charming 6:49 AM “What’s For Lunch In The San Francisco Public Schools” announcement, Jim Hightower’s commentary at 7:49 AM, or the 9:01 AM Writer’s Almanac with Garrison Keillor. Then again, it could be the outstanding weekend programing featuring the likes of Harry Shearer’s Le Show, Sound Opinions, Bullseye and one of my Sunday morning favorites, Philosophy Talk, hosted by philosophy professors John Perry and Ken Taylor. And as an equally rabid listener of linguist and NPR Fresh Air commentator Geoffrey Nunberg, I was thrilled to hear that the trio are planning to team up for a live broadcast of Philosophy Talk at the Marsh Theatre.

Here are the details from the press release / website:

Philosophy Talk live at the Marsh Theatre
November 11th 2012 12:00pm
The Linguistics of Name-Calling with Geoffrey Nunberg

Sticks and bones may break your bones, but names can also hurt you. And language gives us surprisingly many ways deride, hurt and demean – from a subtly sneering intonation to hurtful and offensive names. How does such language work? And why is there so much of it around these days? Has our acerbic political culture ushered in a new era of name-calling? Or is name calling a phenomenon as old as language itself? John and Ken welcome back linguist and NPR commentator Geoffrey Nunberg, author of Ascent of the A-Word: Assholism, The First Sixty Years. Tickets can be purchased online, by phone, or in person through The Marsh’s box office. The Marsh is located at 2120 Allston Way in Berkeley, California.

Lightweight Giant: Mathias Bengtsson’s “Spun”

Mathias Bengtsson - Spun bench

Mathias Bengtsson, Spun, 2005/2012. Dimensions variable. Carbon fiber.

From a story today on Co.DESIGN: In his Spun series from 2002, Danish designer Mathias Bengtsson created “a series of benches and chairs woven from super lightweight carbon fiber. Each piece weighs about two pounds (the lightest furniture ever produced!) thanks to a low-cost industrial fiber spinning technique used by aerospace engineers.” The Co.DESIGN story continues:

A new show at Industry Gallery in D.C. is exciting new interest in Spun, even though the series was designed a decade ago. Why? Because the curators of the show asked Bengtsson to weave 12 Spun benches into a single sinuous tube that spirals around the gallery in a figure eight. Since each bench weighs only a few pounds, the mega-bench doesn’t weigh more than 11 or 12 pounds. And while it may not look structurally sound, it is: visitors are welcome to relax where it touches down on the gallery floor.

“The pattern of the fibre is designed to produce maximum strength from minimum material–only 20% of the surface is carbon,” Bengtsson told Design Museum. Carbon fiber is notoriously expensive (think road bikes or climbing gear). That’s because it’s usually made by hand. The difference here is that Bengtsson is using an industrial fabrication technique in which a robot arm spins around two rotating discs, pulling a thread of carbon into a form dictated by a 3-D model. The final piece is then cured in a kiln, sealing its shape in place. It’s how NASA rapid prototypes things, and it’s far quicker and less expensive than handmaking carbon fiber objects.

From space to your living room, just one example of advanced technology that NASA begat. What other potentially amazing future technological advances might we miss out on if we continue to shortchange space exploration in the name of crashing budgets here on earth?


Sources: Co.DESIGN | Mathias Bengtsson
Exhibition: INDUSTRY announces SPUN: An Installation by Mathias Bengtsson, May 12 – June 29, 2012, Washington D.C.

Alice Neel Late Portraits & Still Lifes David Zwirner, New York May 4 – June 23, 2012

Alice Neel: Late Portraits & Still Lifes
David Zwirner, New York
May 4 – June 23, 2012

David Zwirner is pleased to present an exhibition of portraits and still lifes by Alice Neel, on view at the gallery’s 533 West 19th Street space. This is the second solo exhibition of Neel’s work since David Zwirner started representing her Estate in 2008.

With a practice spanning the 1920s to the 1980s, Alice Neel (1900- 1984) is widely regarded as one of the greatest figurative painters of the twentieth century. Based in New York City, Neel chose her subjects from her family, friends, and a broad variety of locals: writers, poets, artists, students, textile salesmen, psychologists, cabaret singers, and homeless bohemians. Her eccentric selection was thus also a portrayal of, and dialogue with, the city in which she lived. Through her forthright and at times humorous touch, her work engaged with ongoing political and social issues, including gender, racial inequality, and labor struggles.

Neel’s works are characterized by a poised, fluid handling of paint, which combines precise attention to detail with abstract or sketch-like strokes. Her compositions frame her subjects centrally while retaining a sense of autonomy, which in turn broadens the focus of the portrait beyond the face of the sitters to the rest of the canvas.

Neel’s practice was remarkably impervious to the fluctuating artistic movements it witnessed, and she famously reaffirmed her commitment to the human body at a time when her avant-garde contemporaries were denouncing figuration. A stylistic development is nonetheless apparent in her paintings from the 1960s onwards. Coinciding with a growing reputation in the art world, where she had thus far only remained on the margins, Neel’s work grew brighter and more experimental during this decade, and increasingly explored the medium of paint for its expressive qualities.

This exhibition includes portraits and still lifes made between 1964 and 1983, the last two decades of Neel’s life. The portraits affirm the shift in her work towards more luminous compositions, as witnessed for example in Abe’s Grandchildren (1964) and Richard (1969), where the background is partially rendered and supplanted by abstract areas of paint. Likewise, in the still lifes—a genre Neel continued to address throughout her career—such changes are evident in the arbitrary use of perspective and the artist’s bright palette. In Still Life (Breakfast Table) (1965), a bird’s eye view of a strident yellow table is set off by many of the objects on its surface, which are shown from their sides, and in Light (1980), a shadow cast by a sun-lit table omits the flowers arranged on its source. In other still lifes, potted plants and cut flowers take on anthropomorphic presences, and even hint at a subtle version of self-portraiture. Aside from two paintings made in her family home in New Jersey, and a portrait from San Francisco, all of the works in the show were painted in New York.

The exhibition is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue co-published by Radius Books, featuring an essay by Tim Griffin, Executive Director and Chief Curator at The Kitchen, New York, and former Artforum editor.

Alice Neel was born in 1900 in Merion Square, Pennsylvania, and died in 1984 in New York. She had her first retrospective at the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, in 1974, and the Whitney mounted another solo exhibition of her work in 2000, which traveled to the Addison Gallery of American Art at Phillips Academy, Andover, Massachusetts; Philadelphia Museum of Art; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota; and the Denver Art Museum, Colorado.

Since 2008, The Estate of Alice Neel has been represented by David Zwirner, New York, where her work was presented in 2009 in a critically acclaimed, two-venue solo exhibition, Alice Neel: Selected Works and Alice Neel: Nudes of the 1930s (on view at Zwirner & Wirth, New York).

In 2010, the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston in Texas organized a major survey, Alice Neel: Painted Truths, which traveled to Whitechapel Gallery, London, and Moderna Museet Malmö, Sweden. Her work was recently on view in a solo exhibition in 2011 at the Douglas Hyde Gallery, which formed part of the Dublin Contemporary 2011, Terrible Beauty – Art, Crisis, Change & The Office of Non-Compliance.

Work by the artist is represented in major museum collections, including The Art Institute of Chicago; Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco; Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, D.C.; The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Moderna Museet, Stockholm; Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, Texas; The Museum of Modern Art, New York; National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.; Philadelphia Museum of Art; Tate, London; Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art, Hartford, Connecticut; Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Worcester Art Museum, Massachusetts; Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, Connecticut; among others.

Source: David Zwirner, New York
Image Credit: Alice Neel “1972 Jackie Curtis as a Boy” Oil on Canvas, 44 x 30 inches / 111.8 x 76.2 cm Private Collection

Abstract Expressionisms: Paintings and Drawings from the Berkeley Art Museum Collection

Guston book ball and shoe 1971

Abstract Expressionisms: Paintings and Drawings from the Collection
Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
January 18th – June 10th

Abstract Expressionisms brings together approximately forty paintings, works on paper, and sculptures from BAM/PFA’s renowned collection of mid-twentieth century works of art. This international array of work in various media reminds us of the broad reach and long-running influence of the movement and of its many radiating branches.

In signature paintings by artists such as Hans Hofmann, Jackson Pollock, and Mark Rothko we revisit the groundbreaking parameters of new art in post-World War II America. Powerful works from the 1950s and 1960s by Philip Guston, Theodore Stamos, Conrad Marca-Relli, and William Baziotes indicate the breadth and distinctiveness of achievement of the era. Bold, color-saturated works by American artists Sam Francis and Norman Bluhm date from the late 1950s when both artists were based in Paris. In a 1954 etching by German-French artist Hans Hartung, we are introduced to aspects of the dominant French expressionist movement, Tachisme. The CoBrA group, founded in Brussels in 1949, advocated vivid colors, fantastic forms, and interplay of line and color. A monumental work on paper by CoBrA cofounder Pierre Alechinsky demonstrates his dual interest in Japanese calligraphy and expressionist tenets; works by CoBrA cohorts Asger Jorn and Karel Appel also appear in Abstract Expressionisms. Antonio Saura, one of the leaders of Abstract Expressionist explorations in Spain, is represented by Carajaraña (1959), an aggressive black-and-white composition suggestive of Franz Kline and Willem de Kooning. Abstract Expressionist qualities are also strongly evident in a variety of works by artists such as Mark Tobey, Leonard Baskin, and photographer Aaron Siskind. In addition, sculptural works by David Smith, Ibram Lassaw, and Peter Voulkos that accompany paintings in Gallery A and works on paper in Gallery C, suggest how Abstract Expressionism found expression in three dimensions.

Featured artists:
William Baziotes
Hans Hofmann
Norman Bluhm
Asger Jorn
Willem de Kooning
Mark Rothko
Sam Francis
Antonio Saura
Philip Guston
Mark Tobey

Source: Berkeley Art Museum
Image credit: Philip Guston “Untitled (book, ball and shoe)”, 1971

Cindy Sherman Opening at SFMOMA July 14, 2012

Cindy Sherman
San Francisco Museum of Modern Art
July 14 – October 07, 2012

Cindy Sherman is recognized as one of the most important contemporary artists of the last 40 years and arguably the most influential artist working exclusively with photography. Sherman has served as her own model for more than 30 years, generating a range of guises and personas that are by turns amusing and disturbing, distasteful and affecting. Bringing together more than 170 key photographs from a variety of Sherman’s acclaimed bodies of work, the presentation constitutes the first overview of her career in the United States since 1997. This retrospective traces the groundbreaking artist’s career from her early experiments as a student in Buffalo in the 1970s to her recent large-scale photographic murals.

Source: San Francisco Museum of Modern Art

A True Bohemian: The Art of Daniel Clowes at the Oakland Museum of California

Daniel Clowes’ exhibit at the Oakland Museum of California runs through August 12, 2012. Below is a snippet from the announcement.


“A master storyteller and artist. There is poetry in every panel.” -Esquire

Based in Oakland, Daniel Clowes is internationally acclaimed for award-winning comics, graphic novels, and screenplays. With nearly 50 publications in multiple reprints and editions in ten languages, Clowes is credited as the cartoonist most responsible for developing the graphic novel into a credible literary form. The film version of Ghost World (2001), directed by Terry Zwigoff, earned Clowes an Academy Award nomination for the screenplay. Modern Cartoonist: The Art of Daniel Clowes reveals original drawings and artifacts in an inspired installation environment. The exhibition, which is the first major survey of the work of Daniel Clowes, is accompanied by an extensive full-color monograph.

Modern Cartoonist: The Art of Daniel Clowes is organized by guest curator Susan Miller and Senior Curator of Art René de Guzman, with exhibition design by Nicholas de Monchaux.

 

Charles Garabedian: Works from 1966-1976 at L.A. Louver Gallery, Through May 12, 2012

Charles Garabedian: Jean Harlow

Charles Garabedian, Jean Harlow, 1964, oil on canvas, 42 x 57 inches

A reminder: just two weeks left to see Charles Garabedian’s exhibit at the L.A. Louver gallery. Below is the press release in its entirety, and there is also a good Los Angeles Times review by David Pagel, Charles Garabedian: Works from 1966-1976 at L.A. Louver.


Venice, CA –- L.A. Louver is pleased to present an exhibition of paintings and sculptures by Charles Garabedian. Created between 1966 and 1976, the works exemplify the rich diversity of form, image making, and materials that hallmark this early stage of Garabedian’s career.

Garabedian’s work is wonderfully perverse, since he is completely uninterested in abiding by the rules of good taste, draftsmanship, appropriate subject matter, formal composition, or stylistic consistency.
— Marcia Tucker

Garabedian’s work is frequently figurative, often narrative (although narratives are ellusive) and occasionally abstract. He tackles the extremities of life and death, offering a rich stew of passion, greed, sex, violence, celebrity and modernity, in distinctly personal work that embraces his love of literature, and of the ancient cultures of China and Greece.

The encroaching influence of the moving image projected into American homes is the subject of Daytime TV, 1966. Garabedian used Flo-paque (a plastic paint) and fired ceramic to make this collaged collision of images, and painted the TV’s surround to suggest a city scene outside the viewer’s window. The influence of camera lens perspective is evident in Restaurant (The Waitress), also 1966, with its female figure far-grounded, and dwarfed by the receding perspective of looming industrial-sized kitchen equipment aglow under harsh ceiling lights.

During this same period, Garabedian made three-dimensional abstractions in wood and resin after seeing an exhibition of Japanese sculpture in 1965. The current exhibition includes two of these works (dated 1967 and 1970); horizontal, floor-bound forms that he created intuitively. Garabedian has stated: “I started making sculpture and it was just wonderful. I had a great time. Stuff looked good, and I had no problems, no restrictions.”

Garabedian also used resin to make the vertical visual breaks and text of Wood China Wall, 1968; to create the cut-out shapes in Jack Nicholson, 1973; and to form layers in Go Get ‘Em Boy, 1974. Wood China Wall, together with The Meeting of Greece and China, 1970, demonstrate Garabedian’s fascination with, and self-described “fast-moving appreciation” of the cultures andCharles Garabedian, history of both countries. A book about Chinese gardens held Garbedian’s imagination for several years during this period, and led to a lyrical marriage of figurative and abstract forms in a series of works that he enigmatically titled Henry Inn after the book’s author.

Charles Garabedian was born in Detroit in 1923, and moved to California at age nine. During World War II, he was a gunner in the United States Air Force and served as staff sergeant. Following the war, Garabedian studied literature and philosophy at UC Santa Barbara on the GI Bill. He went on to study history at the University of Southern California, and earned his BA in 1950. Thereafter, Garabedian pursued several occupations that included working for Union Pacific Railroad. Encouraged by his friend Ed Moses, he studied painting with Howard Warshaw, and at age 34 entered the University of California, Los Angeles. In 1961, he graduated from UCLA with an MA in art, and stayed to teach at the university, holding several positions until 1973.

Garabedian’s work has been seen internationally, with his inclusion in important group museum exhibitions including the Whitney Museum of American Art Biennial, 1975 and 1985; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, CA, 1976; the Venice Biennale, 1976 (also 1982, ’84 and ’85); The High Museum Atlanta, GA, 1980; the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C., 1984; Brooklyn Museum of Art, NY, 1989; the Sezon Museum of Art, Tokyo, Japan, 1991; and the Corcoran Biennial, 1993. Garabedian received a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship in 1977, a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship in 1979, and the American Academy of Arts and Letters award in 2000.

Garabedian has been honored with several solo museum exhibitions: The La Jolla Museum of Contemporary Art presented a survey of Garabedian’s work in 1981; and in 1983, the Rose Art Museum at Brandeis University, Massachusetts held a mid-career retrospective. In 2003/2004, a survey exhibition of works on paper was presented at the Luckman Gallery, California State University, Los Angeles, and traveled to the Nora Eccles Harrison Museum of Art, Logan, Utah. More recently, the exhibition Charles Garabedian: A Retrospective, curated by Julie Joyce, was presented by the Santa Barbara Museum of Art, CA, 22 January – 17 April 2011. Michael Duncan, Christopher Miles and Nevin Shriner joined Joyce in contributing essays to the accompanying catalogue.

Charles Garabedian: Works from 1966-1976 is part of L.A. Louver’s exhibition programming in conjunction with the Getty initiative Pacific Standard Time. Further Pacific Standard Times exhibitions that include Garabedian’s work are Under the Big Black Sun: California Art 1974-1981, Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, CA, 1 October 2011 – 13 February 2012; and L.A. Raw: Abject Expressionism in Los Angeles, 1945-1980 from Rico Lebrun to Paul McCarthy, Pasadena Museum of California Art, Pasadena, CA, 22 January – 6 May 2012.

Garabedian lives and works in Los Angeles, and continues to paint. An exhibition of new work recently opened at Betty Cuningham Gallery in Chelsea, New York, on view through 24 March 2012.

Concurrent at L.A. Louver, 22 March – 12 May, 2012.

Stop Press: Garry Winogrand’s SFMOMA Retrospective To Open March 2013

Save this date: March 09, 2013. We are happy to learn that the San Francisco Museum of Art will be launching a major Garry Winogrand retrospective next year. Winogrand’s work has been the subject of several posts here recently, including a reflection on his last retrospective in Los Angeles 25 years ago and an incredible interview. We can hardly wait to see how SFMOMA & Leo Rubinfien curates Winogrand’s “prodigious body” of work. Here is the announcement from the SFMOMA website:

This retrospective, organized by SFMOMA under the direction of photographer and writer Leo Rubinfien, is the first major touring exhibition and catalogue in 25 years dedicated to the work of (1928-1984). Despite being widely recognized as one of the preeminent American photographers of the 20th century, Winogrand has to date been inadequately published and incompletely explored by critics and art historians. Postponing the editing of his prodigious body of work and then coming abruptly to the end of his life, he completed only five modest books, which contain just a fraction of his total work and merely suggest his great importance to the history of photography. The curatorial research undertaken for this project has made possible the first exhibition and catalogue that reveal to the public the full breadth of Winogrand’s oeuvre — a jubilant, epic portrait of America that is Whitmanesque in its ambition to encompass the whole of the nation’s life. One of the principal artists in any medium of the eruptive 1960s, Winogrand combines a sense of the hope and buoyancy of American life after World War II with a powerful anxiety, presenting America shining with possibility while also threatening to spin out of control.

Source: San Francisco Museum of Modern Art | Photo Credit: Statue of Liberty Ferry, New York 1971 © Estate of Garry Winogrand